Be Patient. Be Patient. Be Patient

“You have an infinite capacity for patience.”

That is what my fortune cookie said. I had opened this cookie eight years ago, but felt that the fortune was so appropriate, I’ve saved the slip of paper. Of course those that know me well, understand this fortune is light years away from the truth. To tell the truth, I have a…um…little problem with waiting. I just don’t like to do it. I know that no one does, but it really irks me to the core. This can sometimes be a problem in cooking.

Patience in cooking is sometimes good and often times essential. You can’t be impatient with certain meats (pork, poultry) in their cooking. If you are impatient in baking, you get doughy goods. With sautéing onions, patience is truly a virtue. Slow cooking onions until they are truly carmelized is well worth the wait. When I become impatient I just repeat the mantra to be patient.

I used thin sliced chicken breasts in place of full thickness. They cook a little more evenly and have a better ratio of chicken to stuffing.

I think I bought a little too much Brie.

Those wonderful carmelized onions.

Mixing up the stuffing.

Stuffing the chicken.

Ready for the pan.

Frying them up.

Brie-and-Caramelized Onion-Stuffed Chicken Breasts

Prep Time: 15 mins | Cook Time: 25 mins | Makes: 4 servings (serving size: 1 stuffed chicken breast half and 3 tablespoons sauce)

Ingredients:

  • 1 teaspoon olive oil, divided
  • 1 1/2 cups sliced onion
  • 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 2/3 cup dry white wine, divided
  • 2 ounces Brie cheese, rind removed and cheese cut into small pieces
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon black pepper
  • 4 (6-ounce) skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
  • 2 tablespoons minced onion
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh sage
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 (10 1/2-ounce) can low-sodium chicken broth

Directions:

1. Heat 1/2 teaspoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add sliced onion; cook 30 minutes or until golden, stirring often. Add sliced garlic, and sauté 5 minutes. Stir in 1/3 cup wine; cook 5 minutes or until liquid almost evaporates. Spoon onion mixture into a bowl; cool. Stir in Brie, salt, and pepper.

2. Cut a horizontal slit through thickest portion of each chicken breast half to form a pocket. Stuff about 1 1/2 tablespoons onion mixture into pockets.

3. Heat 1/2 teaspoon oil in pan over medium-high heat. Add chicken; cook 6 minutes on each side or until done. Remove chicken from pan; keep warm.

4. Add 1/3 cup wine, minced onion, sage, and minced garlic to pan. Cook over medium-high heat 2 minutes; stir in broth. Bring mixture to a boil, and cook 7 minutes or until sauce is reduced to 3/4 cup. Return chicken to pan; cover and simmer 2 minutes or until thoroughly heated. Serve sauce with chicken.

carbo rating: 6

Source: http://find.myrecipes.com/recipes/recipefinder.dyn?action=displayRecipe&recipe_id=10000001732747

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Categories: Baking, Cheese, Chicken, Low Carb, Main Dish 2, Recipes, Wine

Author:The Ranting Chef

Check out the best recipes at rantingchef.com

10 Comments on “Be Patient. Be Patient. Be Patient”

  1. October 14, 2012 at 12:53 pm #

    I have the same problem with impatience, particularly when pan searing meats. My solution is to make myself do something else at the same time, like read the paper or fold laundry, so I’m not watching seconds tick by on the clock … very……very…… slowly.

    Caramelized onions are my favorite accompaniment to almost anything!

    Like

  2. October 14, 2012 at 1:26 pm #

    The stuffed chicken looks so good! 😀

    Like

  3. October 14, 2012 at 2:27 pm #

    I’ve become rather zen like in my advancing years. I have the patience to rise a dough for 18 or 20 hours and then let it rise a little more and finally bake it.

    And when cooking I do use the timer on my phone. It makes it so much easier. Just set the timer and walk away. Or with something that requires periodic agitation, I just set it for the interval and do the same.

    I’d be screwed without the technology though.

    It makes me wonder how the hell they cooked back about 600 or so years ago. It must have been bland and overcooked!

    Like

  4. October 14, 2012 at 4:02 pm #

    It is 10.00pm and I have just read your post. Shame on you for making me hungry just before I go to bed. I will now need to raid the fridge.

    I have passed the recipe to Mrs Sensible. Thanks

    Like

  5. Nomad Urbanista
    October 15, 2012 at 1:32 am #

    I totally agree with the patience part – I have been very guilty of spoiling a good curry by adding too much water whenever I cook in a hurry or am on the phone.. ditto with burning onions.. and checking on cakes in the oven.. I moved from bad cook to a good one when I learned to pratice Zen while cooking..

    Like

  6. October 15, 2012 at 11:29 am #

    This one looks well-worth the wait!

    Like

  7. October 15, 2012 at 6:32 pm #

    Oh I am DEFINITELY pinning this one for later! Patience is a virtue I need to work on so this is a good one for me!

    Like

  8. October 16, 2012 at 7:18 pm #

    This is an absolutely mouthwatering recipe! I wish I hadn’t just had dinner!!!

    Like

  9. javaj240
    October 20, 2012 at 9:36 pm #

    Thanks for posting this. It sounds fantastic. I am so going to try to sneak the Brie past my teenager, LOL!

    Like

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